pretty in pink vegan

pretty in pink vegan

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Vegan Staple Stew for me and you

Qubo, a children's cartoon network  on antenna tv, sometimes after the cartoon is over they have a short called Vitaminix and it tells children what foods contain what vitamins. I love it mainly because children need to know these things and they include even include vegan options! Sunday morning while watching Jacob Two-Two (yes I still watch cartoons, on purpose might I add) Vitaminix (check out the shorts in the link) came on and today's vitamin was D. I watched the whole thing waiting for the vegan options and there weren't any! I was a little upset then I started to freak out. I haven't been taking my multivitamin like I should and nor has Keithon so I was starting to freak thinking  that I was depriving my growing child of the nutrients that he needed. So I took to the internet to see how we could get it. Here is what I found out about Vitamin D for vegans.

From the Vegatarian Resouce Group.
Is Vitamin D a Special Concern for Vegans
"A vegan diet can be planned to provide adequate amounts of vitamin D through use of fortified foods like fortified soymilk. Any person, whether vegan or not, who does not include good sources of vitamin D in his or her diet or take vitamin D supplements can be at risk for not getting adequate vitamin D, especially if sunlight exposure is limited. Some studies have found that vegans have lower vitamin D intakes than do lactoovo vegetarians or meat-eaters. This may be because cow's milk (a source of vitamin D) is a more common part of the daily menu for non-vegans than vitamin D fortified foods are for vegans.

What Happens If Someone Doesn't Get Enough Vitamin D?

A vitamin D deficiency leads to nutritional rickets, a condition that causes weak and deformed bones in babies and children. Symptoms can include a delay in learning to walk, low height-for-age, and bowing of the legs and arms. Rickets rarely occurs in the U.S., but a recent outbreak of cases has raised concerns that children are not getting enough vitamin D.

In adults, not getting enough vitamin D can increase risk of osteoporosis and other diseases"

So I took to the web to find sources of Vegan Vitamin D because normally it comes from Dairy and we can't have that. I stumbled upon a Raw Vegan Blog and it gave his Top 4 sources. These are his top ways to get Vitman D as a vegan.
1. The Sun
2. Mushrooms
3. Full Spectrum Broad Spectrum or Blue Light Therapy
4. Supplements

Now the top way to naturally get in vitiman D is being
exposed to the sun on your arms for 5-15 minutes a day but in the winter that is hard to do and with it being so cold outside lately, I decided to make what I call a Vegan Staple Stew consisting of all the foods that are "type cast" as vegan foods. I think everyone should include these in there diet vegan or not. Since I may have some omni readers I've included a summary of what these foods are as well at the awesomeness that they include, health wise that is. So much better for you than something that had a mama.

Quinoa's protein content per 100 calories is higher than brown rice, potatoes, barley and millet, but is less than wild rice and oats. Nutritional evaluations of quinoa indicate that it is a source of complete protein. Furthermore, it is a good source of dietary fiber and phosphorus and is high in magnesium and iron. Quinoa is also a source of calcium, and thus is useful for vegans and those who are lactose intolerant. Quinoa is gluten-free and considered easy to digest.

Chickpea is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle EastChickpeas are an excellent source of the essential nutrients, iron, folate, phosphorus, protein and dietary fiber (USDA nutrient table). Chickpeas are low in fat and most of this is polyunsaturated. One hundred grams of mature boiled chickpeas contain 164 calories, 2.6 grams of fat (of which only 0.27 grams is saturated), 7.6 grams of dietary fiber and 8.9 grams of protein. Chickpeas also provide several essential nutrients in moderate amounts of 10-19% of the Daily Value

Kale is a vegetable with green or purple leaves, in which the central leaves do not form a head. It is considered to be closer to wild cabbage than most domesticated forms. Kale is very high in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, and rich in calcium. Kale is a source of two carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin. Kale, as with broccoli and other brassicas, contains sulforaphane (particularly when chopped or minced), a chemical with potent anti-cancer properties. Boiling decreases the level of sulforaphane; however, steaming, microwaving, or stir frying do not result in significant loss. Along with other brassica vegetables, kale is also a source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells.

Nutritional yeast  or Nooch as we vegans call it, is a deactivated yeast, often a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is sold commercially as a food product. It is sold in the form of flakes or as a yellow powder and can be found in the bulk aisle of most natural food stores. It is popular with vegans and vegetarians and may be used as an ingredient in recipes or as a condiment.
It is a source of protein and vitamins, especially the B-complex vitamins, and is a complete protein. It is also naturally low in fat and sodium and is free of sugar, dairy, and gluten. Sometimes nutritional yeast is fortified with vitamin B12.

Nutritional yeast has a strong flavor that is described as nutty, cheesy, or creamy, which makes it popular as an ingredient in cheese substitutes. It is often used by vegans in place of cheese.

Since it was still cold as sin outside, Keithon and I needed something hot, filing and full of Vitamin D to eat after his swim practice. So I whipped up what I call Vegan Staple Stew. I only came up with the name as I was chopping veggies and he asked what I was making. He said ok and walked away.

Vegan Staple Stew
Ingredients:
•7-8 cups of vegetable broth
•1 cup carrots
•3 cups mushrooms chopped
•1 cup squash chopped
•1 small can of tomato paste
•1 cup zucchini chopped
•3 cups chopped mushrooms
•3/4 cup quinoa, drained and rinsed
•1 can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed
•1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
•1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
•2 bay leaves
•Sea salt, to taste

Directions: In a large soup pot, add vegetable bouillon and water. Bring to a boil and stir until dissolved. Add in all ingredients and seasonings and stir well. Bring to a boil again and then simmer on low, stirring occasionally. Cook vegetables until tender for approx. 30 minutes. Add sea salt to taste. Serves 6-7.

Thankfully my vegan freak out was averted because in almost every meal I include mushrooms because of the meaty texture. It is good to know I was unknowingly getting in much needed Vitamin D! 

4 comments:

  1. That looks awesome and super-duper healthy! On vitamin D, I take a vegan calcium/D2 supplement, and most almond/soy/coconut milk is fortified with a good amount of vitamin D2. Watch out for OJ though: the calcium kind has D3....but Kroger brand frozen OJ concentrate with calcium is free of D. :-)

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    1. yeah, i read that V3 is derived from animals.

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  2. I suffered from a scary-low vitamin D deficiency last year. And it happened before I knew it. I was getting sick all of the time and felt very depressed - turns out it was mostly because of this deficiency. My doc prescribed me a high dose of D2 to take for 3 months which got me back to normal levels. Now, I can just take a multi-vitamin with vitamin D. Deficiencies can be so scary, because they can happen before you're aware of anything and make you feel awful. I'm bad about not getting out in the sun, even when it is sunny, because I burn so badly, so I was happy to get my levels back to normal through supplementation. Good post! Important stuff!

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  3. Sounds yummy! I actually have all of those ingredients. I might just have to make this stew this weekend. Stew sounds awesome, especially with all of this cold weather and snow we've been having lately (in Virginia).

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